Research Papers In Computer Science Topics 2012 Gmc

Copyright Information

For Authors

Submission of a manuscript implies: that the work described has not been published before (except in form of an abstract or as part of a published lecture, review or thesis); that it is not under consideration for publication elsewhere; that its publication has been approved by all co-authors, if any, as well as – tacitly or explicitly – by the responsible authorities at the institution where the work was carried out.

Author warrants (i) that he/she is the sole owner or has been authorized by any additional copyright owner to assign the right, (ii) that the article does not infringe any third party rights and no license from or payments to a third party is required to publish the article and (iii) that the article has not been previously published or licensed. The author signs for and accepts responsibility for releasing this material on behalf of any and all co-authors. Transfer of copyright to Springer (respective to owner if other than Springer) becomes effective if and when a Copyright Transfer Statement is signed or transferred electronically by the corresponding author. After submission of the Copyright Transfer Statement signed by the corresponding author, changes of authorship or in the order of the authors listed will not be accepted by Springer.

The copyright to this article, including any graphic elements therein (e.g. illustrations, charts, moving images), is assigned for good and valuable consideration to Springer effective if and when the article is accepted for publication and to the extent assignable if assignability is restricted for by applicable law or regulations (e.g. for U.S. government or crown employees).

The copyright assignment includes without limitation the exclusive, assignable and sublicensable right, unlimited in time and territory, to reproduce, publish, distribute, transmit, make available and store the article, including abstracts thereof, in all forms of media of expression now known or developed in the future, including pre- and reprints, translations, photographic reproductions and microform. Springer may use the article in whole or in part in electronic form, such as use in databases or data networks for display, print or download to stationary or portable devices. This includes interactive and multimedia use and the right to alter the article to the extent necessary for such use.

Authors may self-archive the Author's accepted manuscript of their articles on their own websites. Authors may also deposit this version of the article in any repository, provided it is only made publicly available 12 months after official publication or later. He/she may not use the publisher's version (the final article), which is posted on SpringerLink and other Springer websites, for the purpose of self-archiving or deposit. Furthermore, the Author may only post his/her version provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication and a link is inserted to the published article on Springer's website. The link must be accompanied by the following text: "The final publication is available at link.springer.com".

Prior versions of the article published on non-commercial pre-print servers like arXiv.org can remain on these servers and/or can be updated with Author's accepted version. The final published version (in pdf or html/xml format) cannot be used for this purpose. Acknowledgement needs to be given to the final publication and a link must be inserted to the published article on Springer's website, accompanied by the text "The final publication is available at link.springer.com". Author retains the right to use his/her article for his/her further scientific career by including the final published journal article in other publications such as dissertations and postdoctoral qualifications provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication.

Author is requested to use the appropriate DOI for the article. Articles disseminated via link.springer.com are indexed, abstracted and referenced by many abstracting and information services, bibliographic networks, subscription agencies, library networks, and consortia.

For Readers

While the advice and information in this journal is believed to be true and accurate at the date of its publication, neither the authors, the editors, nor the publisher can accept any legal responsibility for any errors or omissions that may have been made. The publisher makes no warranty, express or implied, with respect to the material contained herein.

All articles published in this journal are protected by copyright, which covers the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute the article (e.g., as offprints), as well as all translation rights. No material published in this journal may be reproduced photographically or stored on microfilm, in electronic data bases, video disks, etc., without first obtaining written permission from the publisher (respective the copyright owner if other than Springer). The use of general descriptive names, trade names, trademarks, etc., in this publication, even if not specifically identified, does not imply that these names are not protected by the relevant laws and regulations.

Springer has partnered with Copyright Clearance Center's RightsLink service to offer a variety of options for reusing Springer content. For permission to reuse our content please locate the material that you wish to use on link.springer.com or on springerimages.com and click on the permissions link or go to copyright.com, then enter the title of the publication that you wish to use. For assistance in placing a permission request, Copyright Clearance Center can be connected directly via phone: +1-855-239-3415, fax: +1-978-646-8600, or e-mail: info@copyright.com.


© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

For a specific paper, enter the identifier into the top right search box.

  • cs.AI - Artificial Intelligence (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all areas of AI except Vision, Robotics, Machine Learning, Multiagent Systems, and Computation and Language (Natural Language Processing), which have separate subject areas. In particular, includes Expert Systems, Theorem Proving (although this may overlap with Logic in Computer Science), Knowledge Representation, Planning, and Uncertainty in AI. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes I.2.0, I.2.1, I.2.3, I.2.4, I.2.8, and I.2.11.

  • cs.CL - Computation and Language (new, recent, current month)

    Covers natural language processing. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Class I.2.7. Note that work on artificial languages (programming languages, logics, formal systems) that does not explicitly address natural-language issues broadly construed (natural-language processing, computational linguistics, speech, text retrieval, etc.) is not appropriate for this area.
    (subsumes cmp-lg)

  • cs.CC - Computational Complexity (new, recent, current month)

    Covers models of computation, complexity classes, structural complexity, complexity tradeoffs, upper and lower bounds. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes F.1 (computation by abstract devices), F.2.3 (tradeoffs among complexity measures), and F.4.3 (formal languages), although some material in formal languages may be more appropriate for Logic in Computer Science. Some material in F.2.1 and F.2.2, may also be appropriate here, but is more likely to have Data Structures and Algorithms as the primary subject area.

  • cs.CE - Computational Engineering, Finance, and Science (new, recent, current month)

    Covers applications of computer science to the mathematical modeling of complex systems in the fields of science, engineering, and finance. Papers here are interdisciplinary and applications-oriented, focusing on techniques and tools that enable challenging computational simulations to be performed, for which the use of supercomputers or distributed computing platforms is often required. Includes material in ACM Subject Classes J.2, J.3, and J.4 (economics).

  • cs.CG - Computational Geometry (new, recent, current month)

    Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes I.3.5 and F.2.2.

  • cs.GT - Computer Science and Game Theory (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all theoretical and applied aspects at the intersection of computer science and game theory, including work in mechanism design, learning in games (which may overlap with Learning), foundations of agent modeling in games (which may overlap with Multiagent systems), coordination, specification and formal methods for non-cooperative computational environments. The area also deals with applications of game theory to areas such as electronic commerce.

  • cs.CV - Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (new, recent, current month)

    Covers image processing, computer vision, pattern recognition, and scene understanding. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes I.2.10, I.4, and I.5.

  • cs.CY - Computers and Society (new, recent, current month)

    Covers impact of computers on society, computer ethics, information technology and public policy, legal aspects of computing, computers and education. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes K.0, K.2, K.3, K.4, K.5, and K.7.

  • cs.CR - Cryptography and Security (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all areas of cryptography and security including authentication, public key cryptosytems, proof-carrying code, etc. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes D.4.6 and E.3.

  • cs.DS - Data Structures and Algorithms (new, recent, current month)

    Covers data structures and analysis of algorithms. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes E.1, E.2, F.2.1, and F.2.2.

  • cs.DB - Databases (new, recent, current month)

    Covers database management, datamining, and data processing. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes E.2, E.5, H.0, H.2, and J.1.

  • cs.DL - Digital Libraries (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all aspects of the digital library design and document and text creation. Note that there will be some overlap with Information Retrieval (which is a separate subject area). Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes H.3.5, H.3.6, H.3.7, I.7.

  • cs.DM - Discrete Mathematics (new, recent, current month)

    Covers combinatorics, graph theory, applications of probability. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes G.2 and G.3.

  • cs.DC - Distributed, Parallel, and Cluster Computing (new, recent, current month)

    Covers fault-tolerance, distributed algorithms, stabilility, parallel computation, and cluster computing. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes C.1.2, C.1.4, C.2.4, D.1.3, D.4.5, D.4.7, E.1.

  • cs.ET - Emerging Technologies (new, recent, current month)

    Covers approaches to information processing (computing, communication, sensing) and bio-chemical analysis based on alternatives to silicon CMOS-based technologies, such as nanoscale electronic, photonic, spin-based, superconducting, mechanical, bio-chemical and quantum technologies (this list is not exclusive). Topics of interest include (1) building blocks for emerging technologies, their scalability and adoption in larger systems, including integration with traditional technologies, (2) modeling, design and optimization of novel devices and systems, (3) models of computation, algorithm design and programming for emerging technologies.

  • cs.FL - Formal Languages and Automata Theory (new, recent, current month)

    Covers automata theory, formal language theory, grammars, and combinatorics on words. This roughly corresponds to ACM Subject Classes F.1.1, and F.4.3. Papers dealing with computational complexity should go to cs.CC; papers dealing with logic should go to cs.LO.

  • cs.GL - General Literature (new, recent, current month)

    Covers introductory material, survey material, predictions of future trends, biographies, and miscellaneous computer-science related material. Roughly includes all of ACM Subject Class A, except it does not include conference proceedings (which will be listed in the appropriate subject area).

  • cs.GR - Graphics (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all aspects of computer graphics. Roughly includes material in all of ACM Subject Class I.3, except that I.3.5 is is likely to have Computational Geometry as the primary subject area.

  • cs.AR - Hardware Architecture (new, recent, current month)

    Covers systems organization and hardware architecture. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes C.0, C.1, and C.5.

  • cs.HC - Human-Computer Interaction (new, recent, current month)

    Covers human factors, user interfaces, and collaborative computing. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes H.1.2 and all of H.5, except for H.5.1, which is more likely to have Multimedia as the primary subject area.

  • cs.IR - Information Retrieval (new, recent, current month)

    Covers indexing, dictionaries, retrieval, content and analysis. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes H.3.0, H.3.1, H.3.2, H.3.3, and H.3.4.

  • cs.IT - Information Theory (new, recent, current month)

    Covers theoretical and experimental aspects of information theory and coding. Includes material in ACM Subject Class E.4 and intersects with H.1.1.

  • cs.LG - Learning (new, recent, current month)

    Covers machine learning and computational (PAC) learning. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Class I.2.6.

  • cs.LO - Logic in Computer Science (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all aspects of logic in computer science, including finite model theory, logics of programs, modal logic, and program verification. Programming language semantics should have Programming Languages as the primary subject area. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes D.2.4, F.3.1, F.4.0, F.4.1, and F.4.2; some material in F.4.3 (formal languages) may also be appropriate here, although Computational Complexity is typically the more appropriate subject area.

  • cs.MS - Mathematical Software (new, recent, current month)

    Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Class G.4.

  • cs.MA - Multiagent Systems (new, recent, current month)

    Covers multiagent systems, distributed artificial intelligence, intelligent agents, coordinated interactions. and practical applications. Roughly covers ACM Subject Class I.2.11.

  • cs.MM - Multimedia (new, recent, current month)

    Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Class H.5.1.

  • cs.NI - Networking and Internet Architecture (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all aspects of computer communication networks, including network architecture and design, network protocols, and internetwork standards (like TCP/IP). Also includes topics, such as web caching, that are directly relevant to Internet architecture and performance. Roughly includes all of ACM Subject Class C.2 except C.2.4, which is more likely to have Distributed, Parallel, and Cluster Computing as the primary subject area.

  • cs.NE - Neural and Evolutionary Computing (new, recent, current month)

    Covers neural networks, connectionism, genetic algorithms, artificial life, adaptive behavior. Roughly includes some material in ACM Subject Class C.1.3, I.2.6, I.5.

  • cs.NA - Numerical Analysis (new, recent, current month)

    Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Class G.1.

  • cs.OS - Operating Systems (new, recent, current month)

    Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes D.4.1, D.4.2., D.4.3, D.4.4, D.4.5, D.4.7, and D.4.9.

  • cs.OH - Other Computer Science (new, recent, current month)

    This is the classification to use for documents that do not fit anywhere else.

  • cs.PF - Performance (new, recent, current month)

    Covers performance measurement and evaluation, queueing, and simulation. Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes D.4.8 and K.6.2.

  • cs.PL - Programming Languages (new, recent, current month)

    Covers programming language semantics, language features, programming approaches (such as object-oriented programming, functional programming, logic programming). Also includes material on compilers oriented towards programming languages; other material on compilers may be more appropriate in Architecture (AR). Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Classes D.1 and D.3.

  • cs.RO - Robotics (new, recent, current month)

    Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Class I.2.9.

  • cs.SI - Social and Information Networks (new, recent, current month)

    Covers the design, analysis, and modeling of social and information networks, including their applications for on-line information access, communication, and interaction, and their roles as datasets in the exploration of questions in these and other domains, including connections to the social and biological sciences. Analysis and modeling of such networks includes topics in ACM Subject classes F.2, G.2, G.3, H.2, and I.2; applications in computing include topics in H.3, H.4, and H.5; and applications at the interface of computing and other disciplines include topics in J.1--J.7. Papers on computer communication systems and network protocols (e.g. TCP/IP) are generally a closer fit to the Networking and Internet Architecture (cs.NI) category.

  • cs.SE - Software Engineering (new, recent, current month)

    Covers design tools, software metrics, testing and debugging, programming environments, etc. Roughly includes material in all of ACM Subject Classes D.2, except that D.2.4 (program verification) should probably have Logics in Computer Science as the primary subject area.

  • cs.SD - Sound (new, recent, current month)

    Covers all aspects of computing with sound, and sound as an information channel. Includes models of sound, analysis and synthesis, audio user interfaces, sonification of data, computer music, and sound signal processing. Includes ACM Subject Class H.5.5, and intersects with H.1.2, H.5.1, H.5.2, I.2.7, I.5.4, I.6.3, J.5, K.4.2.

  • cs.SC - Symbolic Computation (new, recent, current month)

    Roughly includes material in ACM Subject Class I.1.

  • cs.SY - Systems and Control (new, recent, current month)

    This section includes theoretical and experimental research covering all facets of automatic control systems, having as focal point analysis and design methods using tools of modeling, simulation and optimization. Specific areas of research include nonlinear, distributed, adaptive, stochastic and robust control, hybrid and discrete event systems. Application areas include automotive, aerospace, process control, network control, biological systems, multiagent and cooperative control, sensor networks, control of cyberphysical and energy-related systems, control of computing systems.

  • 0 Replies to “Research Papers In Computer Science Topics 2012 Gmc”

    Lascia un Commento

    L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *